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Chrüterei Stein Gruppe

Öffentlich·148 Mitglieder
Timur Muravyov
Timur Muravyov

AutoCAD Architecture 2015 With X-force Keygen PORTABLE 2015



G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of skeletal homeostasis and are likely important in fracture healing. Because GPCRs can activate multiple signaling pathways simultaneously, we used targeted disruption of G(i) -GPCR or activation of G(s) -GPCR pathways to test how each pathway functions in the skeleton. We previously demonstrated that blockade of G(i) signaling by pertussis toxin (PTX) transgene expression in maturing osteoblastic cells enhanced cortical and trabecular bone formation and prevented age-related bone loss in female mice. In addition, activation of G(s) signaling by expressing the G(s) -coupled engineered receptor Rs1 in maturing osteoblastic cells induced massive trabecular bone formation but cortical bone loss. Here, we test our hypothesis that the G(i) and G(s) pathways also have distinct functions in fracture repair. We applied closed, nonstabilized tibial fractures to mice in which endogenous G(i) signaling was inhibited by PTX, or to mice with activated G(s) signaling mediated by Rs1. Blockade of endogenous G(i) resulted in a smaller callus but increased bone formation in both young and old mice. PTX treatment decreased expression of Dkk1 and increased Lef1 mRNAs during fracture healing, suggesting a role for endogenous G(i) signaling in maintaining Dkk1 expression and suppressing Wnt signaling. In contrast, adult mice with activated Gs signaling showed a slight increase in the initial callus size with increased callus bone formation. These results show that G(i) blockade and G(s) activation of the same osteoblastic lineage cell can induce different biological responses during fracture healing. Our findings also show that manipulating the GPCR/cAMP signaling pathway by selective timing of G(s) and G(i) -GPCR activation may be important for optimizing fracture repair. 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.




AutoCAD Architecture 2015 with x-force keygen 2015


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Harpagide, an iridoid glucoside, is a constituent of the root of Harpagophytum procumbens var. sublobatum (Engl.) Stapf, Devil's claw which has been used in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). In the present study, we investigated the anti-osteoporotic potential of harpagide and its underlying mechanism of action in in vitro cell culture and in vivo bone loss animal models. Harpagide was obtained from the alkalic hydrolysis of harpagoside, a major constituent of H. procumbens var. sublobatum Analysis of biomarkers for bone formation in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone resorption in osteoclast cells derived from mouse bone marrow cells was performed to evaluate the mechanism of action. The protective activity of harpagide against bone loss was also evaluated in ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model. Harpagide improved bone properties by stimulating the process of differentiation and maturation of osteoblast cells and suppressing the process of RANKL-induced differentiation of osteoclast cells. In OVX-induced bone loss mouse model, oral administration of harpagide significantly improved recovery of bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume, and trabecular number in the femur. Harpagide also prevented increase of trabecular separation and structure model index induced by OVX. Harpagide effectively inhibited the serum levels of biochemical markers of bone loss, including alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that harpagide has a potential for prevention of bone loss in OVX mice by regulating the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation and the suppression of osteoclast formation. Therefore, these findings suggest that harpagide might serve as a bioactive compound derived from H. procumbens var. sublobatum for improvement of age-dependent bone destruction disease. Copyright 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


Although osteopenia is frequent in spondyloarthritis (SpA), the underlying cellular mechanisms and association with other symptoms are poorly understood. This study aimed to characterize bone loss during disease progression, determine cellular alterations, and assess the contribution of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to bone loss in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Bones of 2-, 6-, and 12-month-old non-transgenic, disease-free HLA-B7 and disease-associated HLA-B27 transgenic rats were examined using peripheral quantitative computed tomography, μCT, and nanoindentation. Cellular characteristics were determined by histomorphometry and ex vivo cultures. The impact of IBD was determined using [21-3 x 283-2]F1 rats, which develop arthritis and spondylitis, but not IBD. HLA-B27 transgenic rats continuously lost bone mass with increasing age and had impaired bone material properties, leading to a 3-fold decrease in bone strength at 12 months of age. Bone turnover was increased in HLA-B27 transgenic rats, as evidenced by a 3-fold increase in bone formation and a 6-fold increase in bone resorption parameters. Enhanced osteoclastic markers were associated with a larger number of precursors in the bone marrow and a stronger osteoclastogenic response to RANKL or TNFα. Further, IBD-free [21-3 x 283-2]F1 rats also displayed decreased total and trabecular bone density. HLA-B27 transgenic rats lose an increasing amount of bone density and strength with progressing age, which is primarily mediated via increased bone remodeling in favor of bone resorption. Moreover, IBD and bone loss seem to be independent features of SpA in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Copyright 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are a group of anti-hypertensive drugs that are widely used to treat pediatric hypertension. Recent application of ARBs to treat diseases such as Marfan syndrome or Alport syndrome has shown positive outcomes in animal and human studies, suggesting a broader therapeutic potential for this class of drugs. Multiple studies have reported a benefit of ARBs on adult bone homeostasis; however, its effect on the growing skeleton in children is unknown. We investigated the effect of Losartan, an ARB, in regulating bone mass and cartilage during development in mice. Wild type mice were treated with Losartan from birth until 6 weeks of age, after which bones were collected for microCT and histomorphometric analyses. Losartan increased trabecular bone volume vs. tissue volume (a 98% increase) and cortical thickness (a 9% increase) in 6-weeks old wild type mice. The bone changes were attributed to decreased osteoclastogenesis as demonstrated by reduced osteoclast number per bone surface in vivo and suppressed osteoclast differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in RAW cells was attenuated by Losartan. Similarly, RANKL-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was suppressed by Losartan, suggesting a convergence of RANKL and angiotensin signaling at the level of ERK1/2 regulation. To assess the effect of Losartan on cartilage development, we examined the cartilage phenotype of wild type mice treated with Losartan in utero from conception to 1 day of age. Growth plates of these mice showed an elongated hypertrophic chondrocyte zone and increased Col10a1 expression level, with minimal changes in chondrocyte proliferation. Altogether, inhibition of the angiotensin pathway by Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in growth plate during skeletal development. Copyright 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


To compare the technique of high speed drilling with irrigation and low speed drilling without irrigation in order to evaluate the success rate and peri-implant bone loss at 12 months of follow-up. A randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial was carried out in patients requiring dental implants to rehabilitate their unitary edentulism. Patients were recruited from the Oral Surgery Unit of the University of Valencia (Spain) between September 2014 and August 2015. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were randomized to two groups: group A (high-speed drilling with irrigation) and group B (low-speed drilling without irrigation). The success rate and peri-implant bone loss were recorded at 12 months of follow-up. Twenty-five patients (9 men and 16 women) with 30 implants were enrolled in the study: 15 implants in group A and 15 implants in group B. The mean bone loss of the implants in group A and group B was 0.83 0.73 mm and 0.62 0.70 mm, respectively (p> 0.05). In the maxilla, the bone loss was 1.04 0.63 mm in group A and 0.71 0.36 mm in group B (p> 0.05), while bone loss in the mandible was 0.59 0.80 mm in group A and 0.69 0.77 mm in group B (p> 0.05). The implant success rate at 12 months was 93.3% in group A and 100% in group B. Within the limitations of the study, the low-speed drilling technique presented peri-implant bone loss outcomes similar to those of the conventional drilling technique at 12 months of follow-up.


Background To compare the technique of high speed drilling with irrigation and low speed drilling without irrigation in order to evaluate the success rate and peri-implant bone loss at 12 months of follow-up. Material and Methods A randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial was carried out in patients requiring dental implants to rehabilitate their unitary edentulism. Patients were recruited from the Oral Surgery Unit of the University of Valencia (Spain) between September 2014 and August 2015. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were randomized to two groups: group A (high-speed drilling with irrigation) and group B (low-speed drilling without irrigation). The success rate and peri-implant bone loss were recorded at 12 months of follow-up. Results Twenty-five patients (9 men and 16 women) with 30 implants were enrolled in the study: 15 implants in group A and 15 implants in group B. The mean bone loss of the implants in group A and group B was 0.83 0.73 mm and 0.62 0.70 mm, respectively (p > 0.05). In the maxilla, the bone loss was 1.04 0.63 mm in group A and 0.71 0.36 mm in group B (p > 0.05), while bone loss in the mandible was 0.59 0.80 mm in group A and 0.69 0.77 mm in group B (p > 0.05). The implant success rate at 12 months was 93.3% in group A and 100% in group B. Conclusions Within the limitations of the study, the low-speed drilling technique presented peri-implant bone loss outcomes similar to those of the conventional drilling technique at 12 months of follow-up. Key words:Low-speed without irrigation, drilling technique. PMID:29053645 350c69d7ab


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